Victorian Bakers | BBC Documentary (2016)

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Victorian Bakers | BBC Documentary (2016)

Victorian Bakers

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each episode runs for 60 min

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BBC documentary exploring baking through the Victorian Age—from the rural style of baking that dominated the early years of the Victorian Age to the refined and more artistic baking of the latter. Four English bakers, Harpreet Baura-Singh, John Foster, Duncan Glendinning, and John Swift take on the challenge supported by food historian Dr. Annie Gray and archaeologist Dr. Alex Langlands.

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Part 01

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Explores the early years of the Victorian Age and the rural style of baking when baking was, mostly, still a family practice for a small community.

(1837 till early 1840's)


Part 02

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Takes a look at the industrial revolution and what this meant for our daily bread.

(1870's - 1880's)


Part 03

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Explores the more refined style of baking at the turn of the century.

(1900)


The series was filmed over 13 days, and covers a rather large period of time, hence it doesn't go quite as in depth as some of the other historical documentaries the BBC has produced over the years.

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BBC Page for Victorian Bakers


Banner image: copyright BBC

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Ways of Seeing by John Berger (1972)

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Ways of Seeing by John Berger (1972)

Ways of Seeing

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by John Berger

Based on the BBC series 'Ways of Seeing' - BBC (1972). First published in 1972, reissued by Penguin in 2009 under their Penguin Modern Classics series.

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Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak.
But there is also another sense in which seeing comes before words. It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world; we explain that world with words, but word can never undo the fact that we are surrounded by it. The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.

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affiliate link


Ways of Seeing / BBC Documentary

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each part runs for 30 min

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PART 1: Draws on ideas Walter Benjamin developed in his essay 'The Work of Art in The Age of Mechanical Reproduction (originally published in 1935, edited and final version published in 1939). It poses the question of how we see and understand art in an age where we can reproduce it. 

PART 2: What is the difference between nudity and nakedness? In this episode, John Berger proposes that almost all European nudes are built around the male fantasy. Woman are shown, naked, in repose, without agency. They are there to be observed. 

PART 3: Details the evolution of oil painting, and it's long tradition, starting in the 16th Century and ending near the beginning of the 20th of depicting valuables, on their own, draped across their owners, or surrounding them. Portraying what can be bought and owned. And, the strange thing of the paintings themselves ending up as valuables, for what they represent.

PART 4: Draws parallels and contrasts between the portraits and still-lives commissioned by the nobility throughout Europe. With the paintings implying: 'This is what I have', whilst advertising tells you: 'This is what you need to be happy, to be fulfilled, to be beautiful, to be attractive, etc.' It points out the juxtaposition of journalism and advertising within magazines, how one page shows you a tragedy, and the next is selling you a 'better you', a 'better life'.

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Though the show came out over four decades ago, the questions and ideas it poses are as relevant today as they were when the series first aired.


Banner image: La Trahison des Images (Ceci n'est pas une pipe) - The Treachery of Images (This is not a pipe) by the Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte. Painted in 1948.

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Internet Library of Early Journals

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Internet Library of Early Journals

 

Internet Library of Early Journals

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a digital library of 18th and 19th Century journals

 

The library offers digitised version of three 18th Century journals, namely: Gentleman's Magazine, The Annual Register, and Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society. And, three 19th Century Journals: Notes and Queries, The Builder, and Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.

The project was a joint effort between the Universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester, and Oxford. It was concluded in 1999, hence the site's 90's outdated set up. Apart from The Builder, the project offers a consecutive 20 year run for each journal.


 

Overview of The Journals

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taken from the about page of ILEJ

 

Gentleman's Magazine started in 1731, a Britain-focused miscellany of information about people, places and events, including news summaries, parliamentary reports, biographies and obituary notices, poems, essays, and a register of current publications.

Annual Register started in 1758, an annual survey of European and world events from a British perspective, but including biographical notices, parliamentary and legal reports, and some book reviews, divided into topical sections with chronological sub-divisions.

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society started in 1660, initially as a forum for the publication of scientific papers of both a general and a specialised nature, although increasingly a learned journal carrying refereed papers from established scientists.

Notes and Queries started in 1849, "a medium of intercommunication for literary men, artists, antiquaries, genealogists, etc.", carrying brief reports of completed research on humanities and related subjects and questions inviting answers in subsequent issues.

The Builder started in 1843, a mine of information on domestic and foreign building developments from the perspective of the architect, engineer, constructor and art historian, including accounts of new buildings, materials, processes and books, and articles on ancient monuments and other historic buildings.

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine started in 1817 (as a Tory rival to the Whig Edinburgh Review), a medium for imaginative literature, publishing English poetry, essays and especially prose fiction, and pioneering the presentation of European literature (particularly German) to a British audience.

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The Life of Linnaeus by D.C. Carr (1837)

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The Life of Linnaeus by D.C. Carr (1837)

The Life of Linnaeus

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The celebrated Swedish naturalist. To which is added, a short account of the botanical systems of Linnaeus and Jussieu, with a slight glance at the discoveries of Goëthe, the great German poet.

Compiled from authentic sources by D.C. Carr, master of the classical school Fakenham and lecturer on botany, physiology, etc.

Quid virtus et quid sapientia possit Utile proposuit nobis exemplar.
— Horace

Holt:

Printed by James Shalders

1837


Bibliographic Information

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Written by Daniel C. Carr - published by James Shalders in 1837 - original from Northwestern University - digitised by Google in 2010, December 20th - 111 pages, of which 87 are relevant - category: botany and biography - subjects: Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778), Antoine Laurent de Jussieu (1748-1836), Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).

Google Books has a free ebook version of the book: a digitised version of the original, as well as a text version, though the latter contains some missing letters and extra symbols.


You can find the book for free on the following site(s)

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Dedication

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I found the dedication to be rather lovely. Mostly because, apart from the religious parts, it resembles some of my own feelings around botany and my study of it.

My Dear Boy,

I know no one more worthy of the respect which the dedication of a book implies than yourself. Although now only eleven years old, you have already been a source of pure delight and satisfaction, to me, and your affectionate mother. Well do I remember the time, when your vain attempts to articulate the simplest words of your native tongue, used to excite our mirth by their failure. From that time to the present, I have ever found you most obedient, teachable, and eager to profit by instruction. I say not this with a view to render you vain in your own eyes—for I trust you will always well reflect, that “every good gift, and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights”—but I mention it to encourage you in your future progress. Persevere, my child, in the path of knowledge and virtue; and if it please God to prolong your life to man’s estate, let it be your main object to render yourself serviceable to your fellow-creatures, and thus profitably employ the talent committed to your care.

You are aware, that it is my intention almost immediately to instruct you in the delightful science of botany. I have waited only until you should be sufficiently acquainted with the Latin and Greek languages, to enable you to pursue it with accuracy, and an enlightened perception of its principles; for although such a preparatory knowledge is not absolutely necessary to form a botanist, it is attended with many decided advantages. To explain to your youthful mind every particular on this head would be needless—I shall merely observe, that most of the terms used in this, as well as in every other science; are derived from those languages; and that to every plant, in the classification of Linnaeus, are allotted two names, which it requires a knowledge of syntactical construction to express correctly.

This first step you have happily accomplished, and may now enter upon the study with a probability of success. I promise myself much happiness in guiding your early progress, but, if I divine aright, you will soon be enabled to pursue your inquiries without my assistance; for so fascinating and easy is this science, after the elementary principles have been properly explained, and so connected are its various parts, that an intelligent and discriminating pupil will find much of his labour anticipated, by the acquisition of some previous fact.

Let the example of the great Linnaeus stimulate you to perseverance. The first thought which occurred to me of dedicating this little book to you, was suggested, by an admiration of that great man’s juvenile powers of observation, and the habit of method which characterised every period of his life. Imitate him in all the virtues he possessed, and shun his failings. If with such a spirit you devote yourself to this beautiful study, I feel an assured conviction that it will have the effect on your mind which I earnestly desire—namely, a veneration of the wisdom and benevolence of the Creator, and a fixed resolution to obey his commands. I am,

MY DEAR BOY,

Your most affectionate Father,

DANIEL C. CARR.

Fakenham,

January, 1837.

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Natural History by Pliny The Elder (77-79AD)

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Natural History by Pliny The Elder (77-79AD)

Naturalis Historia

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by Pliny The Elder

In my opinion, the Perseus Digital Library offers one of the best ways to read and search through Pliny's Natural History. It offers both the latin version—edited by Karl Friedrich Theodor Mayhoff (1841-1914)—as well as the English translation created by John Bostock (1773-1846).

The site makes it easy to navigate through each chapter and book, and offers an easy to search for keywords, either in Pliny's original text or the notes that were added later on. Aside from that, the latin version offers something extra, by clicking the words it offers up a translation, how often the word was used in the text, as well as a linguistic breakdown.



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Europeana

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Europeana

Europeana

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Europeana, apart from curating it's own collections, offers a way to browse the collections of several European institutions (museums, universities, galleries, libraries, and archives). A way to access and explore books, essays, art, music, history, maps, etc. You can create simple searches, as well as complex searches—specifying what kind of media, language, copyright-restrictions, and source you are looking for.

It's co-financed by the European Union

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